Liposomal Vitamin D3

Recent research has shown that Vitamin D could be THE BEST NUTRIENT EVER DISCOVERED! What exactly makes vitamin D so important to our health? ** SAVE $10, while supplies last **
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(Vegan, Non-GMO, Non-Allergen)
Quite simply, it directly and indirectly influences most of what happens in our bodies every second of every day. The health benefits of Vitamin D3 are numerous and significant, from strengthening bones and preventing Osteoporosis, to regulating the immune system, maintaining brain/neurological health, and even maintaining a healthy body weight.

The major biologic function of vitamin D is to maintain normal blood levels of calcium and phosphorus. Vitamin D aids in the absorption of calcium, helping to form and maintain strong bones. It is used, alone or in combination with calcium, to increase bone mineral density and decrease fractures. Recently, research also suggests that vitamin D may provide protection from osteoporosis, hypertension (high blood pressure), and several autoimmune diseases.

Hundreds of studies now link Vitamin D deficiency with significantly higher rates of many forms of cancer and many other illnesses including the common cold and support Vitamin D╒s role in immune health.

What’s most remarkable about Vitamin D is the sheer number of health issues it╒s been linked to. Studies have shown that a lack of Vitamin D may be the primary culprit in depression, heart disease, pregnancy problems, birth defects, skin and other cancers, and Multiple Sclerosis. Almost EVERYTHING in the body relies on it!
Michael F. Holick, Ph.D., M.D Boston University Medical Center.

Because Vitamin D so clearly reduces all-cause mortality, I can say this with great certainty: Vitamin D represents the single most cost-effective medical intervention.
Dr. Greg Plotnikoff, Medical Director, Abbott Northwestern Hospital



General Benefits:
* Promotes Strong Bones & Ligaments*
* Promotes Natural Immune System Support*
* Promotes Natural Weight Management*
* Assists in the Absorption of Calcium and Phosphorus*
* Promotes Regulation of Blood Sugar*
* Promotes Healthy Mental Clarity and Mood*
* Strong Anti-Arthritis and Anti-Osteoporosis Properties*
* Helps Regulate Blood Pressure, Thyroid, and Kidney Function*
* Natural Anti-Inflammatory Support*
* Promotes Insulin Secretion for Natural Diabetic Support*

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information on this site is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professionals or any information contained on or in any product label or packaging. You should not use this information on this site for diagnose or treatment of any health problem or for prescription or medication or other treatment. You should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have suspect you may have a health problem. You should not stop taking any medication without first consulting with your physician.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

This information on this site is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professionals or any information contained on or in any product label or packaging. You should not use this information on this site for diagnose or treatment of any health problem or for prescription or medication or other treatment. You should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have suspect you may have a health problem. You should not stop taking any medication without first consulting with your physician.

The BioAvailability Dilemma

Understanding BioAvailability & Absorption
Since the introduction of vitamins & supplements into the ever expanding area of healthcare, there has been a significant challenge in their true potential & effectiveness. This challenge ties into the way that various vitamins & supplements are delivered and absorbed into the body (most importantly the bloodstream & cells).

The amount and manner that a vitamin or supplement is delivered into the body is measured by its BioAvailability & Absorption.

Scientific research has shown that MANY traditional pill, capsule, tablet, powdered, and liquid vitamins have an AVERAGE Bioavailability & Absorption rate of only 5-20%. Additionally, digestive discomfort CAN also be commonly associated with typically dosed oral vitamins & supplements.

What Is Bio-Availability?
Bio-Availability means absorbing and transferring the given vitamin, nutrient, and or supplement from the digestive tract INTO the bloodstream and then delivered to the cells.

Once the vitamins and supplements are able to reach the bloodstream and cells they then become BioAvailable for the body to use for maximum benefit.
Looking to overcome the serious Bio-Availability & Absorption flaws and limitations of traditional vitamins & supplements, MaxHealthLabs team of skilled scientists dedicated years of research to develop a Delivery Technology unlike any other previously discovered. To consummate this lofty goal MaxHealthLabs turned to Liposomal Science and discovered what we were looking for.

Although there are abundant dietary supplements available in tablet forms, Their water solubility and oral BioAvailabilty are very poor.The potential of nono-encapsulation (liposomes) to successfully solve this problem is very notable.
Dr. Qingrong Huang, Associate Food Science Professor at Rutgers University

Intra-Cellular Vitamins & supplements can achieve up to 1,500% higher Bio-Availability & Absorption rates of traditional pills, capsules, tablets, and liquid vitamins.

Vitamin D Published Medical Quotes
• New research highly suggests that Vitamin D may be one of the best vitamins of all for your body. Researchers have uncovered up to 2,000 different genes (roughly one-sixth of the human genome) that are regulated by Vitamin D. That means almost EVERYTHING your body does relies on it. It affects cell death and proliferation, insulin production, and even the immune system. (1)


• Low Vitamin D will result in your body working far below its potential. And you are probably not getting anywhere near the right amount. Here’s why you will be hearing a lot more about it and how you can add what you need to avoid a Vitamin D deficiency and make your body function at its absolute best. (2)

• We estimate that vitamin D deficiency is the most common medical condition in the world. (3)

• What is most remarkable about Vitamin D is the sheer number of health issues it╒s been linked to. In the past few years, studies have shown that a lack of Vitamin D may be the primary culprit in depression, heart disease, pregnancy problems, birth defects, skin and other cancers, and multiple sclerosis. (4)

• Even if you don╒t suffer from any of these conditions, getting more Vitamin D may still be what the doctor ordered. Many of my patients report a dramatic improvement in their feeling of overall well-being after they increase their Vitamin D levels. A number of experts, including those from the Harvard School of Public Health, have urged the government to raise its recommended daily amount of Vitamin D for adults. (5)

• This is like the Holy Grail of cancer medicine; vitamin D produced a drop in cancer rates greater than that for quitting smoking, or indeed any other countermeasure in existence. (6)

• Vitamin D deficiency is an unrecognized, emerging cardiovascular risk factor, which should be screened for and treated. Vitamin D is easy to assess, and supplementation is simple, safe, and inexpensive. (7)

• Vitamin D is cholecalciferol, a hormone. Deficiencies of hormones can have catastrophic consequences. (8)

• Vitamin D is perhaps the single most powerful nutrient in the known universe for preventing influenza. (9)

• Vitamin D is, without question, the miracle nutrient of the century. (10)

• In all my many years of practice of medicine, I╒ve never seen one vitamin have such profound effects on human health. (11)

• No other method to prevent cancer has been identified that has such a powerful impact. (12)

• I believe Vitamin D is the number one public health advance in medicine in the last twenty years. (13)

• Vitamin D is probably linked to maintaining a healthy body weight. (14)

• Vitamin D supplementation during the winter may reduce the incidence of influenza A, especially in specific subgroups of schoolchildren. A secondary observation suggesting asthmatic children on placebo had six times more asthma attacks than did children on vitamin D. (15)

• Recently, respected author and Integrative Medicine Expert, Dr. Andrew Weil, announced he was revising his recommendation of 1,000 IU per day to 2,000 IU per day based on the accumulation of clinical evidence supporting the higher dosage. (16)

• In humans, Vitamin D is critically important for the development, growth, and maintenance of a healthy body, from gestation until death. (17)

• Vitamin D has widespread benefits for our health and certain chronic diseases in particular. (18)

• Management of vitamin D deficiency may be a simple and cost-effective method to improve blood sugar control and prevent the serious complications associated with diabetes. (19)

• Vitamin D deficiency is a condition where the blood serum levels of Vitamin D╒s are lower than that which the body needs to properly maintain health. (20)

• A deficiency in Vitamin D should not be allowed to remain uncorrected for too long, even in those who are healthy. The longer the deficiency is allowed to persist, the greater the risk of serious health complications such as chronic illness, debilitation, or even early mortality. There are only two ways to correct a Vitamin D deficiency: sunlight exposure or Vitamin D supplementation. (21)

• Four separate studies found it helped protect against lymphoma and cancers of the prostate, lung and, ironically, the skin. The strongest evidence is for colon cancer. I would challenge anyone to find an area or nutrient or any factor that has such consistent anti-cancer benefits as Vitamin D. The data are really quite remarkable. (22)

• There is now intriguing evidence that Vitamin D may have a role in the prevention as well as treatment of certain cancers. (23)

• The major biologic function of Vitamin D is to maintain normal blood levels of calcium and phosphorus. Vitamin D aids in the absorption of calcium, helping to form and maintain strong bones. It is used, alone or in combination with calcium, to increase bone mineral density and decrease fractures. Recently, research also suggests that vitamin D may provide protection from osteoporosis, hypertension (high blood pressure), cancer, and several autoimmune diseases. (24)

• Research suggests vitamin D helps regulate the immune system and helps support heart health, normal blood pressure, healthy blood sugar and healthy aging. And, ongoing research continues to explore the potential connection to certain diseases, including some cancers. (25)

• Data collected from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey USA found that 9% of children across the USA, were Vitamin D deficient while another 61 percent, was Vitamin D insufficient. We expected the prevalence of Vitamin D deficiency would be high, but the magnitude of the problem nationwide was shocking! (26)

• Vitamin D can reduce the severity and frequency of asthma symptoms, and also the likelihood of hospitalizations due to asthma. (27)

• Vitamin D may be an important way to arm the immune system against disorders like the common cold. (28)

• A form of Vitamin D could be one of our body’s main protections against damage from low levels of radiation. (29)

• Vitamin D may reduce the risk of developing multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis is much less common the nearer you get to the tropics, where there is much more sunlight. (30)

• Various studies have shown that people with adequate levels of Vitamin D have a significantly lower risk of developing cancer, compared to people with lower levels. Vitamin D deficiency was found to be prevalent in cancer patients regardless of nutritional status. (31)
References:
(1-5) Michael F. Holick, Ph.D., M.D., Director of Vitamin D Research Laboratory Boston University Medical Center.
(6) Scientist Dennis Mangan.
(7) James H. O’Keefe MD, cardiologist and Director of Preventive Cardiology, Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, Missouri
(8) Dr. William Davis, cardiologist.
(9-10) Mike Adams, natural health researcher and author.
(11) Dr. Soram Khalsa, board-certified internist and medical director for the East-West Medical Research Institute.
(12) Dr. Cedric Garland, Vitamin D expert.
(13) Dr. John Whitcomb, Aurora Sinai Medical Center
(14) University of Georgia, USA.
(15) The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
(16) Dr. Andrew Weil
(17-18) Sue Penckofer, Ph.D., R.N., Loyola University
(19-20) Joanne Kouba, Ph.D., R.D., L.D.N., Loyola University
(21-22) Dr. Edward Giovannucci, Harvard University Professor of Medicine and Nutrition.
(23-25) Dr. Michael Thun commenting on the need to reviewing of sun protection guidelines.
(26) Juhi Kumar, M.D., M.P.H., Children’s Hospital at Montefiore Medical Center, The University Hospital and Academic Medical Center for Albert Einstein College of Medicine.
(27) Harvard Medical School.
(28) University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Children’s Hospital Boston
(29) New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
(30) Dennis Bourdette, Department of Neurology and director of the Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology Center at Oregon Health and Science University, USA.
(31) Cancer Treatment Centers of America.

Vitamin D and Cancer
• VITAMIN D AND CANCER PREVENTION (1)

• Vitamin D: Cancer Prevention Sunny Future (2)

• Vitamin D for Cancer Prevention: Global Perspective (3)

• Vitamin D resistance and colon cancer prevention (4)

• Vitamin D and Breast Cancer (5)

• The Role of Vitamin D in Cancer Prevention (6)

• Vitamin D supplementation for prevention of cancer in adults (7)

• A critical review of Vitamin D and Cancer (8)

• Evidence suggests that calcitriol helps prevent cancer progression by slowing the development of angiogenesis (the growth of new blood vessels in cancerous tissue), increasing cell differentiation and apoptosis (cancer cell death), and by reducing cell proliferation and metastases. Vitamin D influences more than 200 human genes, many of which encode for proteins that are important for regulating cells. When vitamin D status is suboptimal, these gene activities are impaired. (9)

• The most convincing evidence for vitamin D╒s role in cancer prevention comes from studies investigating its effects on colon and rectal cancer (10)

• A pooled analysis of people in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and the Nurses╒ Health Study found that those with the highest blood levels of vitamin D had a 34% lower risk of colorectal cancer than those with the lowest levels. (11)

• American Journal of Preventive Medicine in 2007, found a 50% decreased risk of colorectal cancer in subjects with blood levels of at least 33 ng/mL compared with those with blood levels of 12 ng/mL or lower. (12)

• The vitamin D and cancer conundrum: aiming at a moving target (13)

• A nested case control study of plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and risk of colorectal cancer. (14)

• Vitamin D and prevention of cancer╤ready for prime time (15)

• Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of post-menopausal breast cancer╤results of a large case-control study. (16)

• Vitamin D and prevention of breast cancer: pooled analysis (17)

• Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of breast cancer in the Nurses╒ Health Study II. (18)

• Prediagnostic plasma vitamin D metabolites and mortality among patients with prostate cancer. (19)

• The Relation of Solar Radiation to Cancer Mortality in North America. (20)

• The association of solar ultraviolet B (UVB) with reducing risk of cancer: multifactorial ecologic analysis of geographic variation in age-adjusted cancer mortality rates. (21)

• Ecological studies of the UVB-vitamin D-cancer hypothesis. (22)

• Meta-analysis of observational studies of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and colorectal, breast and prostate cancer and colorectal adenoma (23)

• Relation between prediagnostic serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level and incidence of breast, colorectal, and other cancers. (24)

• The relevance of vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms for cancer: a review of the literature. (25)

• Vitamin D and calcium supplementation reduces cancer risk: results of a randomized trial. (26)

• Molecular actions of vitamin D contributing to cancer prevention. (27)

• Vitamin D and cancer: a review of molecular mechanisms. (28)

• Comparison of vitamin D2 and vitamin D3 supplementation in raising serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D status: a systematic review and meta-analysis (29)

References:
1. Maturitas, Volume 71, Supplement 1, March 2012, Pages S2–S3 9th European Congress on Menopause and Andropause
2. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Volume 100, Number 5
3. ANNALS OF EPIDEMIOLOGY; 19, 7; 468-483
4. Carcinogenesis, Volume 33, Number 3, March 2012 , pp. 475- 482(8)
5. Esther Janowsky, M.D., M.P.H.
6. Journal List Am J Public Health 96(2); Feb 2006 PMC1470481
7. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007469
8. Dermatoendocrinol. 2009 Jan-Feb; 1(1): 25–33.
9. Densie Webb, PhD, RD Today’s Dietitian Vol. 14 No. 10 P. 58
10. Densie Webb, PhD, RD Today’s Dietitian Vol. 14 No. 10 P. 58
11. Densie Webb, PhD, RD Today’s Dietitian Vol. 14 No. 10 P. 58
12. Densie Webb, PhD, RD Today’s Dietitian Vol. 14 No. 10 P. 58
13. J Am Diet Assoc. 2010;110(10):1492-1500.
14. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2007;99(14):1120-1129.
15. N Engl J Med. 2011;364(15):1385-1387.
16. Carcinogenesis. 2008;29(1):93-99.
17. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2007;103(3-5):708-711.
18. Breast Cancer Res. 2011;13(3):
19. PLoS One. 2011;6(4):e18625.
20. Cancer Res 1941;1:191-195.
21. Anticancer Res 2006;26:2687-2699.
22. Anticancer Res 2012;32:223-236.
23. Int J Cancer 2011;128:1414-1424.
24. J Photochem Photobiol B 2010;101:130-136.
25. Anticancer Res 2009;29:3511-3536.
26. Am J Clin Nutr 2007;85:1586-1591.
27. Mol Aspects Med 2008;29:388-396.
28. Biochem J 2012;441:61-76.
29. Am J Clin Nutr 2012.

Vitamin D and Fertility
• Vitamin D may help the up to 25% of couples who are infertile (1)

• The basic research showed that vitamin D plays a role in biological processes in sperm and ovary cells and may affect levels of sex hormones. (2)

• The vitamin D receptor has been found in human testes and sperm in men, and in the ovaries and placenta in women. (3)

• Removing the vitamin D receptor in genetically modified mice leads to decreased sperm count and motility and affects the structure of the testes. In female genetically modified mice, removing this receptor causes changes to the structure of the ovaries and uterus. (4)

• One study reported that in high latitude countries there is a large difference in the amount sunlight in the summer and winter. Also there are decreased conception rates in the winter months and peak conception rates in the summer months. (5)

• One study suggested that women╒s ovulation rates and the receptiveness of their uterus for a fertilised egg is reduced during long dark winters in high latitude countries. (6)

• One study of 2299 men found an association between vitamin D levels and male sex hormone levels. (7)

• Of note, not a single patient with either ovulatory disturbance or polycystic ovary syndrome demonstrated normal Vitamin D levels; 39 per cent of those with ovulatory disturbance and 38 per cent of those with PCOS had serum 25OHD levels consistent with deficiency. (8)

• Given the pandemic of Vitamin D insufficiency, if indeed our observations are substantiated, aggressive repletion with Vitamin D may emerge as an alternative approach to facilitate ovulation resumption with minimal to no risk for ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome or multiple pregnancy. (9)

• Yale University School of Medicine studied 67 infertile women and took Vitamin D measures from them. Only 7 per cent of them had normal vitamin D levels and the rest had either insufficient levels or clinical deficiency. (10)

• At the American Society of Reproductive Medicine conference this year, a study presented by Dr. Briana Rudick from USC showed that a deficiency of Vitamin D can also have a detrimental effect on pregnancy rates after IVF, possibly through an effect on the endometrial lining of the uterus. In her study only 42% of the infertile women going through IVF had normal Vitamin D levels. Vitamin D levels did not impact the number of ampules of gonadotropin utilized nor the number of eggs stimulated, embryos created nor embro quality. However, Vitamin D levels did significantly effect pregnancy rates even when controlled for number of embryos transferred and embryo quality. In this study the pregnancy rate dropped from 51% in Caucasian women undergoing IVF who had normal Vitamin D levels to 44% in those with insufficient levels and 19% in those that were deficient. (11)

References:
1. Robert Jay Rowen, M.D.
2. The Medical University of Graz in Austria
3. Lerchbaum E, Obermayer-Pietsch BM. European Journal of Endocrinology.
4. Lerchbaum E, Obermayer-Pietsch BM. European Journal of Endocrinology.
5. Lerchbaum E, Obermayer-Pietsch BM. European Journal of Endocrinology.
6. Lerchbaum E, Obermayer-Pietsch BM. European Journal of Endocrinology.
7. Lerchbaum E, Obermayer-Pietsch BM. European Journal of Endocrinology.
8. Dr Lubna Pal, Yale University
9. Dr Lubna Pal, Yale University
10. Dr Lubna Pal, Yale University
11. David Kreiner MD, Medical Director East Coast Fertility

Vitamin D Clinical Research
• Prospective study of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level, cardiovascular disease mortality, and all-cause mortality in older U.S. adults. (1)

• Relationship of 25-hydroxyvitamin D with all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality in older community-dwelling adults. (2)

• Vitamin D and mortality in older men and women. (3)

• J. Vitamin D deficiency and mortality. (4)

• Extraskeletal effects of vitamin D in older adults: cardiovascular disease, mortality, mood, and cognition. (5)

• Should long-term care residents be supplemented with vitamin D? (6)

• Prevalence and correlates of vitamin D status in African American men. (7)

• Vitamin D and African Americans. (8)

• Racial disparity in death from colorectal cancer: does vitami n D deficiency contribute? (9)

• Vitamin D, race, and cardiovascular mortality: findings from a national US sample. (10)

• Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in adolescents: race, season, adiposity, physical activity, and fitness. (11)

• Vitamin D requirements during lactation: high-dose maternal supplementation as therapy to prevent hypovitaminosis D for both the mother and the nursing infant. (12)

• Effect of combined maternal and infant vitamin D supplementation on vitamin D status of exclusively breastfed infants. (13)

• Vitamin D deficiency in morbidly obese patients. A case-control study. (14)

• Hypovitaminosis D in obese children and adolescents: relationship with adiposity, insulin sensitivity, ethnicity, an d season. (15)

• Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in obese women: their clinical significance and relationship with anthropometri c and body composition variables. (16)

• Significant Vitamin D Deficiency in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (17)

• Vitamin D Regulation of Immune Function (18)

• Vitamin D Deficiency and Connective Tissue Disease (19)

• Vitamin D Effects on Lung Immunity and Respiratory Diseases (20)

• Vitamin D Deficiency : An Important, Common, and Easily Treatable Cardiovascular Risk Factor (21)

• Current perspectives on vitamin D, immune system, and chronic diseases (22)

• Breast cancer survivors and vitamin D: A review (23)

• Estimated benefit of increased vitamin D status in reducing the economic burden of disease in western Europe (24)

• Vitamin D and prevention of colorectal cancer (25)

• Perspective on Assessment of Vitamin D Nutrition (26)

• Vitamin D and the brain (27)

• Replete vitamin D stores predict reproductive success following in vitro fertilization (28)

• High prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and its association with left ventricular dilation: An echocardiography study in elderly patients with chronic heart failure (29)

• Should vitamin D status be assessed in patients with congestive heart failure? (30)

• Vitamin D Regulation of Immune Function (31)

• Developmental vitamin D deficiency causes abnormal brain development (32)

• Vitamin D as a modulator of cellular antioxidant defence in murine lymphoma (33)

• Low Vitamin D Status Among Obese Adolescents: Prevalence and Response to Treatment (34)

References:
(1) J Am Geriatr Soc. 2009 Sep; 57 (9): 1595-603.
(2) Eur J Clin Nutr. 2010 Feb; 64 (2): 203-9.
(3) Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2009 Nov; 71 (5): 666-72.
(4) Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2009 Nov; 12 (6): 634-9.
(5) Am J Geriatr Pharmacother. 2010 Feb; 8 (1): 4-33
(6) Can J Diet Pract Res. 2008 Spring; 69 (1): 28-31.
(7) BMC Public Health. 2009; 9191.
(8) J Nutr. 2006 Apr; 136 (4): 1126-9.
(9) Cancer. 2010 Oct 13.
(10) Ann Fam Med. 2010 Jan-Feb; 8 (1): 11-8.
(11) Pediatrics. 2010 Jun; 125 (6): 1104-11.
(12) Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Dec; 80 (6 Suppl): 1752S-8S.
(13) Matern Child Nutr. 2009 Jan; 5 (1): 25-32.
(14) Endocrinol Nutr. 2010 Jun-Jul; 57 (6): 256-61.
(15) Metabolism. 2008 Feb; 57 (2): 183-91.
(16) J Endocrinol Invest. 2007 Sep; 30 (8): 653-8.
(17) The Journal or Pediatrics, Vol 154, Issue 1, PP 132-134, Jan 200
(18) Vitamins & Hormones Volume 86, 2011, Pages 1–21 Vitamins and the Immune System
(19) Division of Clinical Immunology, 3rd Department of Medicine, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen
(20) Department of Medicine, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine and Veterans Administration Medical Center, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
(21) Mid America Heart Institute and University of Missouri, Kansas City, Missouri Southside Endocrinology, Birmingham, Alabama Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota Boston University Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts
(22) Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health–University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
(23) Department of Family Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida
(24) Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology Volume 99, Issues 2–3, February–May 2009, Pages 104–113
(25) The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Volume 97, Issues 1–2, October 2005, Pages 179–194
(26) Journal of Clinical Densitometry Volume 2, Issue 4, Winter 1999, Pages 457–464
(27) Best Practice & Research Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism Volume 25, Issue 4, August 2011, Pages 657–669
(28)Fertility and Sterility Volume 94, Issue 4, September 2010, Pages 1314–1319
(29) Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases Volume 20, Issue 9, November 2010, Pages 633–640
(30) Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases Volume 20, Issue 9, November 2010, Pages 627–632
(31) Vitamins & Hormones Volume 86, 2011, Pages 1–21
(32) Psychoneuroendocrinology Volume 34, Supplement 1, December 2009, Pages S247–S257
(33) Nutrition Research Volume 20, Issue 1, January 2000, Pages 91–102
(34) Journal of Adolescent Health Volume 48, Issue 5, May 2011, Pages 448–452

Vitamin D Liposomal Resources
• When peripheral blood leukemic cells from M4 and M5 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients were admixed with liposomal compounds an antiproliferative effect was seen in all five cases, including the two cases where free compounds led to enhanced growth. Liposomal delivery of 1,25 (OH)2 vitamin D3 may offer a novel approach to treatment of myelomonocytic leukemia. (1)

• Vitamin D is a membrane antioxidant. Ability to inhibit iron-dependent lipid peroxidation in liposomes compared to cholesterol, ergosterol and tamoxifen and relevance to anticancer action. (2)

• Biological activity of vitamin D3 in liposomes. (3)

• Metabolism of vitamin D3 administered in liposomes in rat liver. (4)

• Interaction of Liposomal Incorporated Vitamin D3-Analogues and Human Keratinocytes. (5)

• Alkylating Derivatives of Vitamin D Hormone for Prostate Cancer. (6)

• Liposome Targeting to Tumors using Vitamin and Growth Factor Receptors. (7)

• Topical Application of Liposomal Antioxidants for Protection Against CEES Induced Skin Damage. (8)

• In vitro effects of vitamin D3 on the phospholipids of isolated renal brush border membranes. (9)

References:
(1) British Journal of Haematology, Volume 98, Number 1, July 1997 , pp. 186-194(9)
(2) Wiseman H. Pharmacology Group, King╒s College, University of London, UK.
(3) N. L. Khrestovaya; L. I. Apukhovskaya; N. M. Gurina Pharmaceutical Chemistry Journal 1990-01-01
(4) Apukhovskaia, L I; Khrestovaia, N L; Antonenko, L V Ukrainski ╙biokhimicheski╙ zhurnal
(5) Dermatology Department, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Jena, D-07743, Germany
(6) Rahul Ray, Ph.D.
(7) VITAMINS AND HORMONES; 60; 286-332
(8) East Tennessee State University, William L. Stone, Ph.D
(9) JOURNAL OF MEMBRANE BIOLOGY Volume 72, Numbers 1-2 (1983), 85-91, DOI: 10.1007/BF01870316

(Vegan, Non-GMO, Non-Allergen)
Quite simply, it directly and indirectly influences most of what happens in our bodies every second of every day. The health benefits of Vitamin D3 are numerous and significant, from strengthening bones and preventing Osteoporosis, to regulating the immune system, maintaining brain/neurological health, and even maintaining a healthy body weight.

The major biologic function of vitamin D is to maintain normal blood levels of calcium and phosphorus. Vitamin D aids in the absorption of calcium, helping to form and maintain strong bones. It is used, alone or in combination with calcium, to increase bone mineral density and decrease fractures. Recently, research also suggests that vitamin D may provide protection from osteoporosis, hypertension (high blood pressure), and several autoimmune diseases.

Hundreds of studies now link Vitamin D deficiency with significantly higher rates of many forms of cancer and many other illnesses including the common cold and support Vitamin D╒s role in immune health.

What’s most remarkable about Vitamin D is the sheer number of health issues it╒s been linked to. Studies have shown that a lack of Vitamin D may be the primary culprit in depression, heart disease, pregnancy problems, birth defects, skin and other cancers, and Multiple Sclerosis. Almost EVERYTHING in the body relies on it!
Michael F. Holick, Ph.D., M.D Boston University Medical Center.

Because Vitamin D so clearly reduces all-cause mortality, I can say this with great certainty: Vitamin D represents the single most cost-effective medical intervention.
Dr. Greg Plotnikoff, Medical Director, Abbott Northwestern Hospital



General Benefits:
* Promotes Strong Bones & Ligaments*
* Promotes Natural Immune System Support*
* Promotes Natural Weight Management*
* Assists in the Absorption of Calcium and Phosphorus*
* Promotes Regulation of Blood Sugar*
* Promotes Healthy Mental Clarity and Mood*
* Strong Anti-Arthritis and Anti-Osteoporosis Properties*
* Helps Regulate Blood Pressure, Thyroid, and Kidney Function*
* Natural Anti-Inflammatory Support*
* Promotes Insulin Secretion for Natural Diabetic Support*

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information on this site is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professionals or any information contained on or in any product label or packaging. You should not use this information on this site for diagnose or treatment of any health problem or for prescription or medication or other treatment. You should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have suspect you may have a health problem. You should not stop taking any medication without first consulting with your physician.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

This information on this site is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professionals or any information contained on or in any product label or packaging. You should not use this information on this site for diagnose or treatment of any health problem or for prescription or medication or other treatment. You should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have suspect you may have a health problem. You should not stop taking any medication without first consulting with your physician.

The BioAvailability Dilemma

Understanding BioAvailability & Absorption
Since the introduction of vitamins & supplements into the ever expanding area of healthcare, there has been a significant challenge in their true potential & effectiveness. This challenge ties into the way that various vitamins & supplements are delivered and absorbed into the body (most importantly the bloodstream & cells).

The amount and manner that a vitamin or supplement is delivered into the body is measured by its BioAvailability & Absorption.

Scientific research has shown that MANY traditional pill, capsule, tablet, powdered, and liquid vitamins have an AVERAGE Bioavailability & Absorption rate of only 5-20%. Additionally, digestive discomfort CAN also be commonly associated with typically dosed oral vitamins & supplements.

What Is Bio-Availability?
Bio-Availability means absorbing and transferring the given vitamin, nutrient, and or supplement from the digestive tract INTO the bloodstream and then delivered to the cells.

Once the vitamins and supplements are able to reach the bloodstream and cells they then become BioAvailable for the body to use for maximum benefit.
Looking to overcome the serious Bio-Availability & Absorption flaws and limitations of traditional vitamins & supplements, MaxHealthLabs team of skilled scientists dedicated years of research to develop a Delivery Technology unlike any other previously discovered. To consummate this lofty goal MaxHealthLabs turned to Liposomal Science and discovered what we were looking for.

Although there are abundant dietary supplements available in tablet forms, Their water solubility and oral BioAvailabilty are very poor.The potential of nono-encapsulation (liposomes) to successfully solve this problem is very notable.
Dr. Qingrong Huang, Associate Food Science Professor at Rutgers University

Intra-Cellular Vitamins & supplements can achieve up to 1,500% higher Bio-Availability & Absorption rates of traditional pills, capsules, tablets, and liquid vitamins.

Vitamin D Published Medical Quotes
• New research highly suggests that Vitamin D may be one of the best vitamins of all for your body. Researchers have uncovered up to 2,000 different genes (roughly one-sixth of the human genome) that are regulated by Vitamin D. That means almost EVERYTHING your body does relies on it. It affects cell death and proliferation, insulin production, and even the immune system. (1)


• Low Vitamin D will result in your body working far below its potential. And you are probably not getting anywhere near the right amount. Here’s why you will be hearing a lot more about it and how you can add what you need to avoid a Vitamin D deficiency and make your body function at its absolute best. (2)

• We estimate that vitamin D deficiency is the most common medical condition in the world. (3)

• What is most remarkable about Vitamin D is the sheer number of health issues it╒s been linked to. In the past few years, studies have shown that a lack of Vitamin D may be the primary culprit in depression, heart disease, pregnancy problems, birth defects, skin and other cancers, and multiple sclerosis. (4)

• Even if you don╒t suffer from any of these conditions, getting more Vitamin D may still be what the doctor ordered. Many of my patients report a dramatic improvement in their feeling of overall well-being after they increase their Vitamin D levels. A number of experts, including those from the Harvard School of Public Health, have urged the government to raise its recommended daily amount of Vitamin D for adults. (5)

• This is like the Holy Grail of cancer medicine; vitamin D produced a drop in cancer rates greater than that for quitting smoking, or indeed any other countermeasure in existence. (6)

• Vitamin D deficiency is an unrecognized, emerging cardiovascular risk factor, which should be screened for and treated. Vitamin D is easy to assess, and supplementation is simple, safe, and inexpensive. (7)

• Vitamin D is cholecalciferol, a hormone. Deficiencies of hormones can have catastrophic consequences. (8)

• Vitamin D is perhaps the single most powerful nutrient in the known universe for preventing influenza. (9)

• Vitamin D is, without question, the miracle nutrient of the century. (10)

• In all my many years of practice of medicine, I╒ve never seen one vitamin have such profound effects on human health. (11)

• No other method to prevent cancer has been identified that has such a powerful impact. (12)

• I believe Vitamin D is the number one public health advance in medicine in the last twenty years. (13)

• Vitamin D is probably linked to maintaining a healthy body weight. (14)

• Vitamin D supplementation during the winter may reduce the incidence of influenza A, especially in specific subgroups of schoolchildren. A secondary observation suggesting asthmatic children on placebo had six times more asthma attacks than did children on vitamin D. (15)

• Recently, respected author and Integrative Medicine Expert, Dr. Andrew Weil, announced he was revising his recommendation of 1,000 IU per day to 2,000 IU per day based on the accumulation of clinical evidence supporting the higher dosage. (16)

• In humans, Vitamin D is critically important for the development, growth, and maintenance of a healthy body, from gestation until death. (17)

• Vitamin D has widespread benefits for our health and certain chronic diseases in particular. (18)

• Management of vitamin D deficiency may be a simple and cost-effective method to improve blood sugar control and prevent the serious complications associated with diabetes. (19)

• Vitamin D deficiency is a condition where the blood serum levels of Vitamin D╒s are lower than that which the body needs to properly maintain health. (20)

• A deficiency in Vitamin D should not be allowed to remain uncorrected for too long, even in those who are healthy. The longer the deficiency is allowed to persist, the greater the risk of serious health complications such as chronic illness, debilitation, or even early mortality. There are only two ways to correct a Vitamin D deficiency: sunlight exposure or Vitamin D supplementation. (21)

• Four separate studies found it helped protect against lymphoma and cancers of the prostate, lung and, ironically, the skin. The strongest evidence is for colon cancer. I would challenge anyone to find an area or nutrient or any factor that has such consistent anti-cancer benefits as Vitamin D. The data are really quite remarkable. (22)

• There is now intriguing evidence that Vitamin D may have a role in the prevention as well as treatment of certain cancers. (23)

• The major biologic function of Vitamin D is to maintain normal blood levels of calcium and phosphorus. Vitamin D aids in the absorption of calcium, helping to form and maintain strong bones. It is used, alone or in combination with calcium, to increase bone mineral density and decrease fractures. Recently, research also suggests that vitamin D may provide protection from osteoporosis, hypertension (high blood pressure), cancer, and several autoimmune diseases. (24)

• Research suggests vitamin D helps regulate the immune system and helps support heart health, normal blood pressure, healthy blood sugar and healthy aging. And, ongoing research continues to explore the potential connection to certain diseases, including some cancers. (25)

• Data collected from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey USA found that 9% of children across the USA, were Vitamin D deficient while another 61 percent, was Vitamin D insufficient. We expected the prevalence of Vitamin D deficiency would be high, but the magnitude of the problem nationwide was shocking! (26)

• Vitamin D can reduce the severity and frequency of asthma symptoms, and also the likelihood of hospitalizations due to asthma. (27)

• Vitamin D may be an important way to arm the immune system against disorders like the common cold. (28)

• A form of Vitamin D could be one of our body’s main protections against damage from low levels of radiation. (29)

• Vitamin D may reduce the risk of developing multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis is much less common the nearer you get to the tropics, where there is much more sunlight. (30)

• Various studies have shown that people with adequate levels of Vitamin D have a significantly lower risk of developing cancer, compared to people with lower levels. Vitamin D deficiency was found to be prevalent in cancer patients regardless of nutritional status. (31)
References:
(1-5) Michael F. Holick, Ph.D., M.D., Director of Vitamin D Research Laboratory Boston University Medical Center.
(6) Scientist Dennis Mangan.
(7) James H. O’Keefe MD, cardiologist and Director of Preventive Cardiology, Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, Missouri
(8) Dr. William Davis, cardiologist.
(9-10) Mike Adams, natural health researcher and author.
(11) Dr. Soram Khalsa, board-certified internist and medical director for the East-West Medical Research Institute.
(12) Dr. Cedric Garland, Vitamin D expert.
(13) Dr. John Whitcomb, Aurora Sinai Medical Center
(14) University of Georgia, USA.
(15) The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
(16) Dr. Andrew Weil
(17-18) Sue Penckofer, Ph.D., R.N., Loyola University
(19-20) Joanne Kouba, Ph.D., R.D., L.D.N., Loyola University
(21-22) Dr. Edward Giovannucci, Harvard University Professor of Medicine and Nutrition.
(23-25) Dr. Michael Thun commenting on the need to reviewing of sun protection guidelines.
(26) Juhi Kumar, M.D., M.P.H., Children’s Hospital at Montefiore Medical Center, The University Hospital and Academic Medical Center for Albert Einstein College of Medicine.
(27) Harvard Medical School.
(28) University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Children’s Hospital Boston
(29) New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
(30) Dennis Bourdette, Department of Neurology and director of the Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology Center at Oregon Health and Science University, USA.
(31) Cancer Treatment Centers of America.

Vitamin D and Cancer
• VITAMIN D AND CANCER PREVENTION (1)

• Vitamin D: Cancer Prevention Sunny Future (2)

• Vitamin D for Cancer Prevention: Global Perspective (3)

• Vitamin D resistance and colon cancer prevention (4)

• Vitamin D and Breast Cancer (5)

• The Role of Vitamin D in Cancer Prevention (6)

• Vitamin D supplementation for prevention of cancer in adults (7)

• A critical review of Vitamin D and Cancer (8)

• Evidence suggests that calcitriol helps prevent cancer progression by slowing the development of angiogenesis (the growth of new blood vessels in cancerous tissue), increasing cell differentiation and apoptosis (cancer cell death), and by reducing cell proliferation and metastases. Vitamin D influences more than 200 human genes, many of which encode for proteins that are important for regulating cells. When vitamin D status is suboptimal, these gene activities are impaired. (9)

• The most convincing evidence for vitamin D╒s role in cancer prevention comes from studies investigating its effects on colon and rectal cancer (10)

• A pooled analysis of people in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and the Nurses╒ Health Study found that those with the highest blood levels of vitamin D had a 34% lower risk of colorectal cancer than those with the lowest levels. (11)

• American Journal of Preventive Medicine in 2007, found a 50% decreased risk of colorectal cancer in subjects with blood levels of at least 33 ng/mL compared with those with blood levels of 12 ng/mL or lower. (12)

• The vitamin D and cancer conundrum: aiming at a moving target (13)

• A nested case control study of plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and risk of colorectal cancer. (14)

• Vitamin D and prevention of cancer╤ready for prime time (15)

• Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of post-menopausal breast cancer╤results of a large case-control study. (16)

• Vitamin D and prevention of breast cancer: pooled analysis (17)

• Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of breast cancer in the Nurses╒ Health Study II. (18)

• Prediagnostic plasma vitamin D metabolites and mortality among patients with prostate cancer. (19)

• The Relation of Solar Radiation to Cancer Mortality in North America. (20)

• The association of solar ultraviolet B (UVB) with reducing risk of cancer: multifactorial ecologic analysis of geographic variation in age-adjusted cancer mortality rates. (21)

• Ecological studies of the UVB-vitamin D-cancer hypothesis. (22)

• Meta-analysis of observational studies of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and colorectal, breast and prostate cancer and colorectal adenoma (23)

• Relation between prediagnostic serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level and incidence of breast, colorectal, and other cancers. (24)

• The relevance of vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms for cancer: a review of the literature. (25)

• Vitamin D and calcium supplementation reduces cancer risk: results of a randomized trial. (26)

• Molecular actions of vitamin D contributing to cancer prevention. (27)

• Vitamin D and cancer: a review of molecular mechanisms. (28)

• Comparison of vitamin D2 and vitamin D3 supplementation in raising serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D status: a systematic review and meta-analysis (29)

References:
1. Maturitas, Volume 71, Supplement 1, March 2012, Pages S2–S3 9th European Congress on Menopause and Andropause
2. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Volume 100, Number 5
3. ANNALS OF EPIDEMIOLOGY; 19, 7; 468-483
4. Carcinogenesis, Volume 33, Number 3, March 2012 , pp. 475- 482(8)
5. Esther Janowsky, M.D., M.P.H.
6. Journal List Am J Public Health 96(2); Feb 2006 PMC1470481
7. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007469
8. Dermatoendocrinol. 2009 Jan-Feb; 1(1): 25–33.
9. Densie Webb, PhD, RD Today’s Dietitian Vol. 14 No. 10 P. 58
10. Densie Webb, PhD, RD Today’s Dietitian Vol. 14 No. 10 P. 58
11. Densie Webb, PhD, RD Today’s Dietitian Vol. 14 No. 10 P. 58
12. Densie Webb, PhD, RD Today’s Dietitian Vol. 14 No. 10 P. 58
13. J Am Diet Assoc. 2010;110(10):1492-1500.
14. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2007;99(14):1120-1129.
15. N Engl J Med. 2011;364(15):1385-1387.
16. Carcinogenesis. 2008;29(1):93-99.
17. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2007;103(3-5):708-711.
18. Breast Cancer Res. 2011;13(3):
19. PLoS One. 2011;6(4):e18625.
20. Cancer Res 1941;1:191-195.
21. Anticancer Res 2006;26:2687-2699.
22. Anticancer Res 2012;32:223-236.
23. Int J Cancer 2011;128:1414-1424.
24. J Photochem Photobiol B 2010;101:130-136.
25. Anticancer Res 2009;29:3511-3536.
26. Am J Clin Nutr 2007;85:1586-1591.
27. Mol Aspects Med 2008;29:388-396.
28. Biochem J 2012;441:61-76.
29. Am J Clin Nutr 2012.

Vitamin D and Fertility
• Vitamin D may help the up to 25% of couples who are infertile (1)

• The basic research showed that vitamin D plays a role in biological processes in sperm and ovary cells and may affect levels of sex hormones. (2)

• The vitamin D receptor has been found in human testes and sperm in men, and in the ovaries and placenta in women. (3)

• Removing the vitamin D receptor in genetically modified mice leads to decreased sperm count and motility and affects the structure of the testes. In female genetically modified mice, removing this receptor causes changes to the structure of the ovaries and uterus. (4)

• One study reported that in high latitude countries there is a large difference in the amount sunlight in the summer and winter. Also there are decreased conception rates in the winter months and peak conception rates in the summer months. (5)

• One study suggested that women╒s ovulation rates and the receptiveness of their uterus for a fertilised egg is reduced during long dark winters in high latitude countries. (6)

• One study of 2299 men found an association between vitamin D levels and male sex hormone levels. (7)

• Of note, not a single patient with either ovulatory disturbance or polycystic ovary syndrome demonstrated normal Vitamin D levels; 39 per cent of those with ovulatory disturbance and 38 per cent of those with PCOS had serum 25OHD levels consistent with deficiency. (8)

• Given the pandemic of Vitamin D insufficiency, if indeed our observations are substantiated, aggressive repletion with Vitamin D may emerge as an alternative approach to facilitate ovulation resumption with minimal to no risk for ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome or multiple pregnancy. (9)

• Yale University School of Medicine studied 67 infertile women and took Vitamin D measures from them. Only 7 per cent of them had normal vitamin D levels and the rest had either insufficient levels or clinical deficiency. (10)

• At the American Society of Reproductive Medicine conference this year, a study presented by Dr. Briana Rudick from USC showed that a deficiency of Vitamin D can also have a detrimental effect on pregnancy rates after IVF, possibly through an effect on the endometrial lining of the uterus. In her study only 42% of the infertile women going through IVF had normal Vitamin D levels. Vitamin D levels did not impact the number of ampules of gonadotropin utilized nor the number of eggs stimulated, embryos created nor embro quality. However, Vitamin D levels did significantly effect pregnancy rates even when controlled for number of embryos transferred and embryo quality. In this study the pregnancy rate dropped from 51% in Caucasian women undergoing IVF who had normal Vitamin D levels to 44% in those with insufficient levels and 19% in those that were deficient. (11)

References:
1. Robert Jay Rowen, M.D.
2. The Medical University of Graz in Austria
3. Lerchbaum E, Obermayer-Pietsch BM. European Journal of Endocrinology.
4. Lerchbaum E, Obermayer-Pietsch BM. European Journal of Endocrinology.
5. Lerchbaum E, Obermayer-Pietsch BM. European Journal of Endocrinology.
6. Lerchbaum E, Obermayer-Pietsch BM. European Journal of Endocrinology.
7. Lerchbaum E, Obermayer-Pietsch BM. European Journal of Endocrinology.
8. Dr Lubna Pal, Yale University
9. Dr Lubna Pal, Yale University
10. Dr Lubna Pal, Yale University
11. David Kreiner MD, Medical Director East Coast Fertility

Vitamin D Clinical Research
• Prospective study of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level, cardiovascular disease mortality, and all-cause mortality in older U.S. adults. (1)

• Relationship of 25-hydroxyvitamin D with all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality in older community-dwelling adults. (2)

• Vitamin D and mortality in older men and women. (3)

• J. Vitamin D deficiency and mortality. (4)

• Extraskeletal effects of vitamin D in older adults: cardiovascular disease, mortality, mood, and cognition. (5)

• Should long-term care residents be supplemented with vitamin D? (6)

• Prevalence and correlates of vitamin D status in African American men. (7)

• Vitamin D and African Americans. (8)

• Racial disparity in death from colorectal cancer: does vitami n D deficiency contribute? (9)

• Vitamin D, race, and cardiovascular mortality: findings from a national US sample. (10)

• Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in adolescents: race, season, adiposity, physical activity, and fitness. (11)

• Vitamin D requirements during lactation: high-dose maternal supplementation as therapy to prevent hypovitaminosis D for both the mother and the nursing infant. (12)

• Effect of combined maternal and infant vitamin D supplementation on vitamin D status of exclusively breastfed infants. (13)

• Vitamin D deficiency in morbidly obese patients. A case-control study. (14)

• Hypovitaminosis D in obese children and adolescents: relationship with adiposity, insulin sensitivity, ethnicity, an d season. (15)

• Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in obese women: their clinical significance and relationship with anthropometri c and body composition variables. (16)

• Significant Vitamin D Deficiency in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (17)

• Vitamin D Regulation of Immune Function (18)

• Vitamin D Deficiency and Connective Tissue Disease (19)

• Vitamin D Effects on Lung Immunity and Respiratory Diseases (20)

• Vitamin D Deficiency : An Important, Common, and Easily Treatable Cardiovascular Risk Factor (21)

• Current perspectives on vitamin D, immune system, and chronic diseases (22)

• Breast cancer survivors and vitamin D: A review (23)

• Estimated benefit of increased vitamin D status in reducing the economic burden of disease in western Europe (24)

• Vitamin D and prevention of colorectal cancer (25)

• Perspective on Assessment of Vitamin D Nutrition (26)

• Vitamin D and the brain (27)

• Replete vitamin D stores predict reproductive success following in vitro fertilization (28)

• High prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and its association with left ventricular dilation: An echocardiography study in elderly patients with chronic heart failure (29)

• Should vitamin D status be assessed in patients with congestive heart failure? (30)

• Vitamin D Regulation of Immune Function (31)

• Developmental vitamin D deficiency causes abnormal brain development (32)

• Vitamin D as a modulator of cellular antioxidant defence in murine lymphoma (33)

• Low Vitamin D Status Among Obese Adolescents: Prevalence and Response to Treatment (34)

References:
(1) J Am Geriatr Soc. 2009 Sep; 57 (9): 1595-603.
(2) Eur J Clin Nutr. 2010 Feb; 64 (2): 203-9.
(3) Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2009 Nov; 71 (5): 666-72.
(4) Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2009 Nov; 12 (6): 634-9.
(5) Am J Geriatr Pharmacother. 2010 Feb; 8 (1): 4-33
(6) Can J Diet Pract Res. 2008 Spring; 69 (1): 28-31.
(7) BMC Public Health. 2009; 9191.
(8) J Nutr. 2006 Apr; 136 (4): 1126-9.
(9) Cancer. 2010 Oct 13.
(10) Ann Fam Med. 2010 Jan-Feb; 8 (1): 11-8.
(11) Pediatrics. 2010 Jun; 125 (6): 1104-11.
(12) Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Dec; 80 (6 Suppl): 1752S-8S.
(13) Matern Child Nutr. 2009 Jan; 5 (1): 25-32.
(14) Endocrinol Nutr. 2010 Jun-Jul; 57 (6): 256-61.
(15) Metabolism. 2008 Feb; 57 (2): 183-91.
(16) J Endocrinol Invest. 2007 Sep; 30 (8): 653-8.
(17) The Journal or Pediatrics, Vol 154, Issue 1, PP 132-134, Jan 200
(18) Vitamins & Hormones Volume 86, 2011, Pages 1–21 Vitamins and the Immune System
(19) Division of Clinical Immunology, 3rd Department of Medicine, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen
(20) Department of Medicine, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine and Veterans Administration Medical Center, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
(21) Mid America Heart Institute and University of Missouri, Kansas City, Missouri Southside Endocrinology, Birmingham, Alabama Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota Boston University Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts
(22) Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health–University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
(23) Department of Family Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida
(24) Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology Volume 99, Issues 2–3, February–May 2009, Pages 104–113
(25) The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Volume 97, Issues 1–2, October 2005, Pages 179–194
(26) Journal of Clinical Densitometry Volume 2, Issue 4, Winter 1999, Pages 457–464
(27) Best Practice & Research Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism Volume 25, Issue 4, August 2011, Pages 657–669
(28)Fertility and Sterility Volume 94, Issue 4, September 2010, Pages 1314–1319
(29) Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases Volume 20, Issue 9, November 2010, Pages 633–640
(30) Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases Volume 20, Issue 9, November 2010, Pages 627–632
(31) Vitamins & Hormones Volume 86, 2011, Pages 1–21
(32) Psychoneuroendocrinology Volume 34, Supplement 1, December 2009, Pages S247–S257
(33) Nutrition Research Volume 20, Issue 1, January 2000, Pages 91–102
(34) Journal of Adolescent Health Volume 48, Issue 5, May 2011, Pages 448–452

Vitamin D Liposomal Resources
• When peripheral blood leukemic cells from M4 and M5 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients were admixed with liposomal compounds an antiproliferative effect was seen in all five cases, including the two cases where free compounds led to enhanced growth. Liposomal delivery of 1,25 (OH)2 vitamin D3 may offer a novel approach to treatment of myelomonocytic leukemia. (1)

• Vitamin D is a membrane antioxidant. Ability to inhibit iron-dependent lipid peroxidation in liposomes compared to cholesterol, ergosterol and tamoxifen and relevance to anticancer action. (2)

• Biological activity of vitamin D3 in liposomes. (3)

• Metabolism of vitamin D3 administered in liposomes in rat liver. (4)

• Interaction of Liposomal Incorporated Vitamin D3-Analogues and Human Keratinocytes. (5)

• Alkylating Derivatives of Vitamin D Hormone for Prostate Cancer. (6)

• Liposome Targeting to Tumors using Vitamin and Growth Factor Receptors. (7)

• Topical Application of Liposomal Antioxidants for Protection Against CEES Induced Skin Damage. (8)

• In vitro effects of vitamin D3 on the phospholipids of isolated renal brush border membranes. (9)

References:
(1) British Journal of Haematology, Volume 98, Number 1, July 1997 , pp. 186-194(9)
(2) Wiseman H. Pharmacology Group, King╒s College, University of London, UK.
(3) N. L. Khrestovaya; L. I. Apukhovskaya; N. M. Gurina Pharmaceutical Chemistry Journal 1990-01-01
(4) Apukhovskaia, L I; Khrestovaia, N L; Antonenko, L V Ukrainski ╙biokhimicheski╙ zhurnal
(5) Dermatology Department, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Jena, D-07743, Germany
(6) Rahul Ray, Ph.D.
(7) VITAMINS AND HORMONES; 60; 286-332
(8) East Tennessee State University, William L. Stone, Ph.D
(9) JOURNAL OF MEMBRANE BIOLOGY Volume 72, Numbers 1-2 (1983), 85-91, DOI: 10.1007/BF01870316

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