Organic Cabbage Powder


Cabbage Powder contains the B vitamins thiamin (vitamin B1) and riboflavin (vitamin B2).


Organic, FreezeDried
It also contains the minerals magnesium, calcium and potassium and some vitamin A and vitamin C. Cabbage also contains additional antioxidant compounds, known as indoles and sulforaphane. Red cabbage is significantly more nutritious then white cabbage, having higher antioxidant polyphenols up to eight times the vitamin C content than white.

Since cabbage is one of the cruciferous vegetables, the health benefits of cabbage are similar to those of other cruciferous vegetables, like Broccoli and Brussel.

Antioxidants in cabbage may help fight cancer. Indole-3-carbonol, in particular, has promise in protection against hormone sensitive cancers like breast cancer, due to its ability to deactivate a potent estrogen metabolite that can promote breast tumor growth. Indol-3-carbonol has also been shown to help stop other cancers from metastasising (spreading). Indol-3-carbonol has also shown some promise in protecting against prostate cancer cell growth. Sulforaphane is a potent detoxifier. It helps boost liver detoxification enzymes and has also been shown to cause programmed cell death of abnormal and cancerous cells.

Compounds in cruciferous vegetables may also be associated with a lower incidence of lung, colon, ovarian and bladder cancer. One study conducted at the University of Texas looked at the diets of over 1000 bladder cancer patients and healthy controls and found that those eating the most cruciferous vegetables were found to have a 29% lower risk of bladder cancer compared to those who ate the least.

In Poland, where women eat a lot of cabbage, breast cancer rates are lower. The Polish Women’s Study looked at cabbage consumption in Polish women living in the U.S. and found that compared with women who ate only one serving or less of cabbage per week during adolescence, those who ate four or more servings were 72% less likely to develop breast cancer as adults.

Cabbage juice is an age-old remedy for peptic ulcer disease, probably due to its high concentration of glutamine, an amino acid that promotes gut health. The compounds in cabbage are better available when cabbage is raw or lightly cooked, rather than overcooked in hot foods. Rather eat cabbage raw or lightly stir-fried or steamed for best results. Allowing chopped cabbage to sit for five minutes before cooking also increases its antioxidant potential.

Glucosinolates in Cabbage and Their Anti-Cancer Thiocyanates

Best Cabbage Source Glucosinolate Derived Isothiocyanate Isothiocyanate Abbreviation
red cabbage glucoraphanin sulforaphane SFN
savoy cabbage glucobrassicin indole-3-carbinol* I3C
savoy and green cabbage sinigrin allyl-isothiocyanate AITC
green cabbage glucotropaeolin benzyl-isothiocyanate BITC

* Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) is not an isothiocyanate. It’s a benzopyrrole, and it is only formed when isothiocyanates made from glucobrassicin are further broken down into non-sulfur containing compounds.

The isothiocyanates (ITCs) made from cabbage’s glucosinolates act to protect us against cancer through a variety of different mechanisms. In some cases, they help regulate inflammation by altering the activity of messaging molecules within our body’s inflammatory system. In other cases, they improve our body’s detoxification system and leave our cells with a smaller toxic load. But the bottom line is decreased risk of cancer from consumption of cabbage and its glucosinolates. We’ve seen one study, from Poland, showing impressive reduction of breast cancer risk in women consuming large amounts of cabbage. (In this particular study, this reduction in risk was associated with consumption of at least 4 cabbage servings per week, in comparison with the once-per-week serving consumed by women with higher breast cancer risk.)

• Ambrosone CB, Tang L. Cruciferous vegetable intake and cancer prevention: role of nutrigenetics. Cancer Prev Res (Phila Pa). 2009 Apr;2(4):298-300. 2009.

• Bhattacharya A, Tang L, Li Y, et al. Inhibition of bladder cancer development by allyl isothiocyanate. Carcinogenesis. 2010 Feb;31(2):281-6. 2010.

• Higdon JV, Delage B, Williams DE, et al. Cruciferous Vegetables and Human Cancer Risk: Epidemiologic Evidence and Mechanistic Basis. Pharmacol Res. 2007 March; 55(3): 224-236. 2007.

• Hu R, Khor TO, Shen G, Jeong WS, Hebbar V, Chen C, Xu C, Reddy B, Chada K, Kong AN. Cancer chemoprevention of intestinal polyposis in ApcMin/+ mice by sulforaphane, a natural product derived from cruciferous vegetable. Carcinogenesis. 2006 May 4; [Epub ahead of print. 2006. PMID:16675473.

• Kahlon TS, Chiu MC, Chapman MH. Steam cooking significantly improves in vitro bile acid binding of collard greens, kale, mustard greens, broccoli, green bell pepper, and cabbage. 2008 Jun;28(6):351-7. 2008.

• Kurilich AC, Tsau GJ, Brown A, et al. Carotene, tocopherol, and ascorbate contents in subspecies of Brassica oleracea. J Agric Food Chem 1999 Apr;47(4):1576-81 1999. PMID:13300.

• Kushad MM, Brown AF, Kurilich AC, et al. Variation of glucosinolates in vegetable crops of Brassica oleracea. J Agric Food Chem 1999 Apr;47(4):1541-8 1999. PMID:13320.

• Kusznierewicz, B, Bartoszek A., Wolska, L et al. Partial characterization of white cabbages (Brassica oleracea var. capitata f. alba) from different regions by glucosinolates, bioactive compounds, total antioxidant activities, and proteins. LWT Food Science and Technology 2008, 41, 1-9. 2008.

• Miron A, Hancianu M, Aprotosoaie AC et al. [Contributions to chemical study of the raw polysaccharide isolated from the fresh pressed juice of white cabbage leaves]. Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi. 2006 Oct-Dec;110(4):1020-6. 2006.

• Prawan A, Saw CL, Khor TO et al. Anti-NF-kappaB and anti-inflammatory activities of synthetic isothiocyanates: effect of chemical structures and cellular signaling. Chem Biol Interact. 2009 May 15;179(2-3):202-11. 2009.

• Rungapamestry V, Duncan AJ, Fuller Z et al. Effect of cooking brassica vegetables on the subsequent hydrolysis and metabolic fate of glucosinolates. Proc Nutr Soc. 2007 Feb;66(1):69-81. 2007.

• Silberstein JL, Parsons JK. Evidence-based principles of bladder cancer and diet. Urology. 2010 Feb;75(2):340-6. 2010.

• Steinbrecher A, Linseisen J. Dietary Intake of Individual Glucosinolates in Participants of the EPIC-Heidelberg Cohort Study. Ann Nutr Metab 2009;54:87-96. 2009.

• Tang L, Zirpoli GR, Guru K, et al. Consumption of Raw Cruciferous Vegetables is Inversely Associated with Bladder Cancer Risk. 2007 Apr 15;67(8):3569-73. 2007.

• Tang L, Zirpoli GR, Jayaprakash V, et al. Cruciferous vegetable intake is inversely associated with lung cancer risk among smokers: a case-control study. BMC Cancer 2010, 10:162. 2010.

• Vidrih R, Filip S, Hribar J. Content of higher fatty acids in green vegetables. Czech Journal of Food Sciences 2009, 27 Special Issue: S125-S129. 2009.

• Voorrips LE, Goldbohm RA, et al. Vegetable and fruit consumption and risks of colon and rectal cancer in a prospective cohort study: The Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer. Am J Epidemiol. 2000 Dec 1;152(11):1081-92. 2000. PMID:11117618.

• Zhao H, Lin J, Grossman HB, Hernandez LM, Dinney CP, Wu X. Dietary isothiocyanates, GSTM1, GSTT1, NAT2 polymorphisms and bladder cancer risk. Int J Cancer. 2007 May 15;120(10):2208-13. 2007. PMID:17290402.

Why Freeze Drying vs. other less expensive drying methods?
Freeze drying, or Lyophilization is the most common processing method for removing moisture from biopharmaceuticals, and it can increase the stability, temperature tolerance, and shelf life of these products. Although Freeze drying is well established within the industry, it requires expensive equipment that takes up a great deal of space within a production facility. Freeze drying also can take days to complete, and manufacturers that need a powdered product must incorporate a granulation step to the process. In an environment where budgets are tightening, and where time and facility space are at a premium, Freeze drying might be a difficult option for some companies.
Freeze drying removes the water, not the flavor. So freeze dried foods retain virtually all their fresh food taste, vitamins and nutritional content. Weighs less than fresh Freeze dried foods have 98% of their water removed. This significantly reduces the food’s weight, making it easier to handle and less costly to transport.
Once freeze dried, food products have the following benefits:
Appearance – Freeze dried foods maintain their original shape and texture, unlike air dried foods which shrink and shrivel due to high temperature processing. Just add water and in minutes the food rehydrates to its original form.
Taste – Tastes as good as fresh. Freeze drying removes the water, not the flavor. So freeze dried foods retain virtually all their fresh food taste, vitamins and nutritional content.
Weight – Weighs less than fresh. Freeze dried foods have 98% of their water removed. This significantly reduces the food’s weight, making it easier to handle and less costly to transport.
Long Shelf Life – Freeze dried foods can be stored for months or years at room temperature without deterioration or spoilage.
Low Storage Costs – Because it can be stored at room temperature, freeze dried food does not require costly cold or chilled storage facilities, making it much cheaper to store.

Freeze Drying vs. Other Drying Methods:

Freeze Drying Drum Drying Air Drying Spray Drying
100% 65% 45% 30%

Additional information

Weight 1.25 lbs
Dimensions 2 x 2 x 4 in

8 oz, 5 lbs


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